April 17, 2014   302 notes
vegan-vulcan:

knarsisus:

animalsareothernations:

Urgh. :c No words can express my disgust.

Sickening, truly.

Nobody is BORN wanting to hurt animals. It’s a behavior that’s taught to you by your parents and your culture. You can unlearn cruelty. It doesn’t have to be this way.

vegan-vulcan:

knarsisus:

animalsareothernations:

Urgh. :c No words can express my disgust.

Sickening, truly.

Nobody is BORN wanting to hurt animals. It’s a behavior that’s taught to you by your parents and your culture. You can unlearn cruelty. It doesn’t have to be this way.

(Source: , via fuckyeahcompassion)

April 17, 2014   193 notes

(via fuckyeahveganlife)

April 16, 2014   6,033 notes

alloftheveganfood:

Vegan Cheesecake Round Up

Apple Pie Cheesecake (GF)

Peanut Butter Caramel Cheesecake

Vegan Key Lime Cheesecake (GF/raw)

Chocolate Chip Chickpea Cheesecake

5 Ingredient Vegan Pumpkin Cheesecake

Banana Rum Cheesecake

Mint Chip Cheesecake (NF)

Vegan Peanut Butter Chocolate Cheesecake

Oreo Vegan Cheesecake

Vegan Blueberry Cheesecake

(via fuckyeahcompassion)

April 14, 2014   926 notes

vegan-art:

"The Pig I Am"  |  Miru Kim

(via folkstar)

April 12, 2014   41 notes

(Source: penqczone, via fuckyeahcompassion)

April 10, 2014   7 notes

This shocking side to the greyhound industry was recently exposed on ABC’s Lateline.

For the estimated 20,000 greyhound pups bred for racing each year in Australia, the outlook is bleak. Like in horse racing, there is no happy retirement for most of these dogs. If they aren’t profitable, they are often killed. A high injury rate also sees many dogs killed — their injuries too ‘uneconomical’ to treat.

In this profit driven industry, the value placed on these living, breathing animals is only as great as the money they bring in.

A small number of retired racing greyhounds are rehomed, but they make up only a tiny fraction of dogs discarded by the industry. Every year, greyhound breeders, trainers and owners send thousands of healthy young dogs to be killed. And as Sydney-based veterinarian Ted Humphries described on Lateline, "[Some] do it inhumanely. They shoot them or hammer them or throw them off bridges. I knew one particular person who would hang them."

The greyhound racing industry depends on punters to turn a profit. By refusing to attend or bet on greyhound racing and encouraging your friends to do the same, you can take a stand against an industry that profits at the animals’ expense.

These dogs also need your voice! Please let the greyhound racing bodies* and your state MP know that killing healthy dogs will never be accepted by a caring community.

CLICK HERE TO SPEAK UP NOW 

April 10, 2014   17 notes

End cruel baiting and netting of Australia’s sharks!

Coastlines across Australia are becoming increasingly dangerous places to swim – for sharks. Despite the fact many shark species are in decline – along the coast of WA, QLD and NSW, sharks are being trapped in nets, painfully hooked and killed in an attempt to reduce encounters with beach-goers.

But experts have warned that these cruel measures won’t work, and that they’ll only further dwindle the numbers of threatened and endangered species, like Great Whites, Bull Sharks and Tiger Sharks. If that weren’t bad enough, shark netting and baited hooks also threaten countless non-targeted marine animals, like dolphins, turtles and even whales.

Since the introduction of shark ‘control measures’, thousands of protected sharks – including many who did not pose any threat to humans – have died along Australia’s shorelines. With non-lethal control methods already available, such as shark enclosures, deterrent devices and air patrols, it’s time for the governments of WA, QLD and NSW to recognise that sharks don’t deserve to be hunted down and killed.

A cruel death

Drum lines with large hooks attached are baited to attract sharks. Animals caught on these hooks, including undersized sharks, non-target species of shark, as well as other marine life can suffer for hours before being discovered by patrols.

Shark nets are often submerged along popular coastlines. But, despite public misconceptions, shark nets don’t keep sharks out, they kill them. In fact, many sharks caught in these nets are actually found on the shore-side. Sharks need to keep moving in order to breathe, so when they become tangled in nets and are unable to swim, they may slowly suffocate to death.

Collateral Damage

While shark nets are designed to allow smaller fish through, any number of marine animals, including seals, dolphins, dugongs, and turtles can become twisted up, injured and can even drown in nets. In 2013, a humpback whale calf died after becoming tangled in a shark net off a Sydney beach.

Although baited hooks are less likely to kill non-target species than nets, animals such as dolphins and turtles can still get caught, as can those sharks who pose no threat to humans. In fact, in 2013, half of sharks caught off NSW beaches were not considered a threat– but only 5% of all sharks found in nets survived.

Avoiding an encounter

Most people will never see a shark at a beach – and the chances of having an encounter with one are incredibly low (in fact you’re more likely to be killed falling out of bed!). However there are many ways that we can all enjoy Australia’s beautiful beaches whilst improving our personal safety – you’ll find some great tips here. Ultimately, it’s important to remember that sharks are not the ‘bad guys’ – they are trying to survive like any other wild animal, and we are simply visitors in their ocean home.

CLICK HERE TO TAKE ACTION 

April 6, 2014   12 notes
superfoodsfan:

(Via: fuckyeahveganlife.tumblr.com) Photo

superfoodsfan:

(Via: fuckyeahveganlife.tumblr.com) Photo

April 3, 2014   1,007 notes
awonderfulnameblog:

beingveganiseasy:

95% of rabbits who are purchased as Easter gifts die within the first year, so this year we are going to give away plush rabbits, along with educational materials about bunnies, in front of a large pet store to bring attention to this issue and encourage people to think before they buy. I have started a Go Fund Me page to fundraise for his big project. Please help us spread the word!  Find out more here: http://www.gofundme.com/7gtepw

Hi! An update: Our project is 73% funded!!! We are so excited and we feel like we are entering the home stretch. Thank you so much to everyone who has liked/shared/donated/and supported in any way. Please join in and help us save rabbits!

awonderfulnameblog:

beingveganiseasy:

95% of rabbits who are purchased as Easter gifts die within the first year, so this year we are going to give away plush rabbits, along with educational materials about bunnies, in front of a large pet store to bring attention to this issue and encourage people to think before they buy. I have started a Go Fund Me page to fundraise for his big project. Please help us spread the word!
Find out more here: http://www.gofundme.com/7gtepw

Hi! An update: Our project is 73% funded!!! We are so excited and we feel like we are entering the home stretch. Thank you so much to everyone who has liked/shared/donated/and supported in any way. Please join in and help us save rabbits!

April 3, 2014

awonderfulnameblog asked: Hi! I am doing a fundraiser to help rabbits who are purchased as Easter gifts. 95% of rabbits purchased as Easter gifts die within the 1st year, so Im doing a give away of plush rabbits, along with educational materials about bunnies, in front of a large pet store to bring attention to this issue and encourage people to think before they buy. I have started a Go Fund Me page to fundraise for his big project. Would you be willing to reblog my post about the project? It be such a HUGE help, <3!!!

That’s so wonderful of you! sure doll xx